A Jew to the Jews 978-3-16-149293-8 - Mohr Siebeck
Theology

David J. Rudolph

A Jew to the Jews

Jewish Contours of Pauline Flexibility in 1 Corinthians 9:19–23

[Den Juden wie ein Jude. Eine Untersuchung der jüdischen Konturen der Paulinischen Flexibilität in 1 Kor 9,19–23.]

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David J. Rudolph raises new questions about Paul's view of the Torah and Jewish identity in this post-supersessionist interpretation of 1 Corinthians 9:19–23. Paul's principle of accommodation is considered in light of the diversity of Second Temple Judaism and Jesus' example and rule of accommodation. This Cambridge University dissertation won the 2007 Franz Delitzsch Prize from the Freie Theologische Akademie.
David Rudolph's primary aim is to demonstrate that scholars overstate their case when they maintain that 1 Cor 9:19–23 is incompatible with a Torah-observant Paul. A secondary aim is to show how one might understand 1 Cor 9:19–23 as the discourse of a Jew who remained within the bounds of pluriform Second Temple Judaism. Part I addresses the intertextual, contextual and textual case for the traditional reading of 1 Cor 9:19–23. Weaknesses are pointed out and alternative approaches are considered. The exegetical case in Part II centres on interpreting 1 Cor 9:19–23 in light of Paul's recapitulation in 1 Cor 10:32–11:1, which concludes with the statement, »Be imitators of me, as I am of Christ«. Given the food-related and hospitality context of 1 Cor 8–10, and Paul's reference to dominical sayings that point back to Jesus' example and rule of adaptation, it is argued that 1 Cor 9:19–23 reflects Paul's imitation of Jesus' accommodation-oriented table-fellowship with all. As Jesus became all things to all people through eating with ordinary Jews, Pharisees and sinners, Paul became »all things to all people« through eating with ordinary Jews, strict Jews (those »under the law«) and Gentile sinners. This Cambridge University dissertation won the 2007 Franz Delitzsch Prize from the Freie Theologische Akademie.
Authors/Editors

David J. Rudolph Born 1967; Ph.D. in New Testament from Cambridge University; M.A. in Old Testament and M.A. in Biblical Languages from Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary; currently Director of the School of Jewish Studies at Messianic Jewish Theological Institute in Los Angeles and Scholar-in-Residence at the MJTI Center for Jewish-Christian Relations.

Reviews

The following reviews are known:

In: New Testament Abstracts — 56 (2012), S. 188
In: Studies in Christian-Jewish Relations — http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/scjr/article/view/3196/2809 (01/2013) (Meira Z. Kensky)
In: Biblica — 94 (2013), S. 138–142 (Alvaro Pereira Delgado)
In: Journal of the Ev. Theol. Society — 2012, S. 436–439 (Chris Miller)
In: Journal for the Study of the NT — 34.5 (2012), S. 89 (Robert S. Dutch)
In: Trinity Journal — 34 (2013), S. 109–111 (Eckhard J. Schnabel)
In: De Stem van het Boek — 2012, Heft 2, S. 21 (PJT)
In: The Biblical Annals — 4 (2014), S. 461–465 (Marcin Kowalski)
In: Neotestamenica — 52.1 (2018), S. 242–244 (Christoph Stenschke)