Israel, Church, and the Gentiles in the Gospel of Matthew 978-3-16-153608-3 - Mohr Siebeck
Theology

Matthias Konradt

Israel, Church, and the Gentiles in the Gospel of Matthew

Translated by Kathleen Ess

[Israel, Kirche und die Völker im Matthäusevangelium.]

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ISBN 978-3-16-153608-3
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Published in English.
Matthias Konradt addresses one of the central theological problems of Matthew's Gospel: what are the relationships between Israel and the Church and between the mission to Israel and the mission to the Gentiles? To answer these questions, the author traces the surprising transition from the Israel-centered words and deeds of Jesus (and his disciples) before Easter to the universal mission of Jesus' earliest followers after his resurrection.
Matthias Konradt explores a problem central to the theological conception of the Gospel of Matthew: What is the cause for the transition from the Israel-centered activities of Jesus and his disciples previous to Easter to the universal mission after Easter, and how is the formation of the church related to Israel's role as God's chosen nation in Matthew's concept? In conjunction with a detailed scrutiny of the traditional interpretation that Matthew propagates the replacement of Israel by the church and – in keeping with this – of the mission to Israel by the universal mission, the author maintains that the Israel-centered and the universal dimension of salvation are positively interconnected in the narrative conception, in which Matthew develops Jesus' messianic identity as the Son of David and the Son of God. Published in North America by Baylor University Press, Waco.
Authors/Editors

Matthias Konradt Geboren 1967; Studium der Ev. Theologie in Bochum und Heidelberg; 1996 Promotion; 1999 Ordination; 2002 Habilitation; seit 2009 Professor für Neues Testament an der Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg.

Reviews

The following reviews are known:

In: Etudes Théologiques et Réligieuses — 92 (2017), S. 487–489 (Céline Rohmer)
In: Religious Studies Review — 42 (2016), S. 41 (David C. Sim)