Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind 978-3-16-149660-8 - Mohr Siebeck
Theology

Max J. Lee

Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind

Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and his Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries

[Moralische Bildung in der griechisch-römischen Philosophie des Geistes. Eine Kartographie des moralischen Milieus des Apostel Paulus und seiner Zeitgenossen in der jüdischen Diaspora.]

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Max J. Lee examines the philosophies of Platonism and Stoicism during the Greco-Roman era and their rivals including Diaspora Judaism and Pauline Christianity on how to transform a person's character from vice to virtue. He describes each philosophical school's respective teachings on diverse moral topoi such as emotional control, ethical action and habit, character formation, training, mentorship, and deity.
Max J. Lee provides a synoptic picture of the moral traditions – especially those of Platonism and Stoicism – which shaped the intellectual and cultural environment of Greco-Roman antiquity. He describes each philosophical school's respective teachings on diverse moral topoi such as emotional control, ethical action and habit, character formation, training, mentorship, and deity. He then organizes each school's tenets into systemic models of moral transformation. For Platonism, the author analyzes the works of Plato, Plutarch, Alcinous and Galen; and for Stoicism, Zeno, Chrysippus, Musonius Rufus, Seneca, and Epictetus, among others. He also constructs a taxonomy of six interaction types to gauge how rival religio-philosophical sects, including Diaspora Judaism and Pauline Christianity, appropriated moral traditions from their Greco-Roman environment to articulate their own system of ethics.
Authors/Editors

Max J. Lee Born 1968; 2002 PhD in Theology; 2002–03 Assistant (Adjunct) Professor of Religious Studies, Westmont College, Santa Barbara, CA; 2003–06 Visiting Assistant Professor of New Testament, Wheaton College, Wheaton, IL; 2006–08 Assistant Professor of New Testament; since 2008 Associate Professor of New Testament, North Park Theological Seminary, Chicago, IL.

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