Theology

Daniel B. Glover

Patterns of Deification in the Acts of the Apostles

[Muster der Vergöttlichung in der Apostelgeschichte.]

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In this study, Daniel B. Glover evaluates the deification scenes in the Book of Acts by locating them within the broader ancient Mediterranean context of deification. He offers a fresh reading of Acts that situates each of the five scenes within a distinct literary pattern recognizable to its earliest readers.
Five times throughout the course of Luke's narrative in Acts, an individual character is identified as (a) god. Rarely have scholars read these deification scenes within their narrative and historical settings with sufficient care. With regard to the narrative setting, scholars working on the deification scenes tend to take one or another as normative and read the remaining acclamations in light of a particular interpretation of that one pericope. However, such reading strategies run aground when they arrive at the final acclamation (28:1–10), which breaks the exegetical bow of the interpretive ship.
In this study, Daniel B. Glover evaluates the deification scenes in the Book of Acts by locating them within the broader ancient Mediterranean context of deification. He offers a fresh reading of Acts that situates each of the five scenes within a distinct literary pattern recognizable to its earliest readers.
Survey of contents
Chapter 1: Introduction
1.1 Problems to be Addressed
1.2 Review of Recent Scholarly Trends
1.3 The Argument of This Study
1.4 Methodology
1.5 Presuppositions
1.6. Plan of Study

Chapter 2: Defining Divinity (Part 1): Understanding Divinity in Mediterranean Antiquity
2.1 What Makes a God a God?
2.2 Concepts of Divine Humans in Mediterranean Antiquity
2.3 Conclusion

Chapter 3: Defining Divinity (Part 2): Deification and Jewish Monotheism
3.1 Jewish Monotheism in Recent Debate
3.2 Moses as a Divine Figure in Hellenistic Judaism
3.3 Judaism, Monotheism, and Mosaic Deification: A Summary
3.4 Conclusion

Chapter 4: Desiring Divinity: Self-Deification and Its Functions
4.1 Self-Deification in the Ancient Mediterranean
4.2 Simon the Samaritan
4.3 Herod Agrippa I
4.4 Conclusion

Chapter 5: Denying Divinity: Denials of Divine Claims in Mediterranean Antiquity
5.1 Denying Divinity in the Ancient Mediterranean
5.2 Peter's Refusal of Cornelius's Worship
5.3 Paul and Barnabas, »gods” in Lystra?
5.4 Conclusion: Peter, Paul, and Their Divine Denials

Chapter 6: Discerning Divinity: Paul »the god” in Malta
6.1 A Critical Review of Scholarship on Acts 28:1–10
6.2 Discerning Divinity on Malta
Excursus: Shadows, Cloths, and Garments – Localized Divine Power in Luke/Acts
6.3 The Power at Work in Paul and Paul's Divinity
6.4 Conclusion

Chapter 7: Conclusion: Summary and Paths for Future Engagement
7.1 Summary of Study
7.2 Paths for Future Engagement
7.3 Final Thoughts
Authors/Editors

Daniel B. Glover Born 1993; 2017 M.T.S. Duke University Divinity School; 2021 PhD Baylor University; currently Assistant Professor of New Testament at Lee University, Cleveland, TN.
https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4621-7099

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