Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE 978-3-16-152351-9 - Mohr Siebeck
Theology

Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE

Ed. by Jörg Rüpke and Gregory D. Woolf

[Religiöse Dimensionen des Selbst im zweiten Jahrhundert n. Chr.]

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Did new senses of the self emerge in the High Roman Empire, and if so what were the religious corollaries? Were such changes connected to processes of institutional change? Could they usefully be described as »individualisation«? These are the key concerns of the authors of this volume.
Did new senses of the self emerge in the High Roman Empire, and if so what were the religious corollaries? Were such changes connected to processes of institutional change? Could they usefully be described as »individualisation«? These are the key concerns of the authors of this volume. They address the field of Hellenistic philosophy, medical texts and the literature of the so-called Second Sophistic, which all have been recruited to this debate. Most important, however, religious phenomena are included and brought to the fore. Thus the analysis of concepts of the self in Plutarch and Epictetus is followed by studies of the »Shepherd of Hermas,« Clement of Alexandria and Ptolemaeus of Rome, Justin Martyr and the Corpus Hermeticum. Notions of the »self« are traced in concepts of body and soul, I and god(s), but also in practices like dressing and ideas about political identity. Lucian of Samosata, a central author of the Second Sophistic, is shown to be involved in such discourses and practices in a sequence of studies. It is this kind of institutional setting which turns out to have been of central importance for the development of concepts of the »self« in the period under consideration. Thus, in a final section, the authors address philosophical advice on dealing with sick friends, the individuality implied in votive practices, and institutions for religious educations within the field of Christian practices.
Survey of contents
Gregory D. Woolf/Jörg Rüpke: Introduction
Rethinking Philosophical Tradition
Eran Almagor: Dualism and the Self in Plutarch's Thought – Jula Wildberger: Delimiting a Self by God: Epictetus and Other Stoics Religious Concepts of the Self Jörg Rüpke: Two Cities and One Self: Transformations of Jerusalem and Reflexive Individuality in the Shepherd of Hermas – Harry O. Maier: Dressing for Church: Tailoring the Christian Self in Clement of Alexandria – Christoph Markschies: Das 'Selbst' in der Valentinianischen Gnosis – Anders Klostergaard Petersen: Emergence of Selfhood in the Writings of Justin – Anna Van den Kerchove: Self-Affirmation and Self-Negation in the Hermetic Revelation Treatises – Richard Gordon: Innovation, Individuality and Power in Graeco-Roman Religion: The Mystagogue Second Sophistic Perspectives Wolfgang Spickermann: Philosophical Standards and Individual Life Style: Lucian's Peregrinus/Proteus – Charlatan and Hero – Dorothee Elm von der Osten: Habitus corporis und Selbstdarstellung in Lukians Alexander oder der Lügenprophet und der Apologie des Apuleius Practices of the Self Zsuzsanna Várhelyi: Selves in Sickness and Health: Some Religious Aspects of Self-Care Among the Imperial Elite – Elena Muñiz Grivaljo: Votive Offerings and the Self in Roman Athens – Peter Gemeinhardt: Wege und Umwege zum Selbst: Bildung und Religion im frühen Christentum
Authors/Editors

Jörg Rüpke Geboren 1962; 1995–99 Professor für Klassische Philologie an der Universität Potsdam; 1999–2008 Professor für Vergleichende Religionswissenschaft an der Universität Erfurt; seit 2008 Fellow am Max-Weber-Kolleg und Sprecher der Kollegforschergruppen »Religiöse Individualisierung in historischer Perspektive« (2008–18) und »Religion und Urbanität: Wechselseitige Formationen« (2018–22).
https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4173-9587

Gregory D. Woolf Born 1961; 2009–10 Fellow of the Max Weber College of the University of Erfurt; Professor of Ancient History in the University of St Andrews, Scotland; currently holds a Major Research Fellowship from the Leverhulme Trust to investigate the origins of religious pluralism in the Roman World.

Reviews

The following reviews are known:

In: Theologische Literaturzeitung — 139 (2014), S. 210–212 (Katharina Greschat)
In: Theological Book Review — 27 (2016), S. 9–10
In: New Testament Abstracts — 58 (2014), S. 449
In: Review of Biblical Literature — http://www.bookreviews.org (08/2015) (Clayton N. Jefford)